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Breaking: Fair Anchorage Announces Defeat of Prop 1

By | Press Releases

ANCHORAGE — Today Fair Anchorage announced, based on the most recent numbers released by municipal officials, that Proposition 1, a ballot measure that would have removed nondiscrimination protections for transgender people from Anchorage’s city ordinances, has been defeated. The municipality has yet to officially declare the results, but with the NO campaign leading by 52.7%, and the YES campaign trailing behind by 47.3% with approximately fewer than 10K votes left to count, the campaign has declared it nearly impossible for Proposition 1 to pass.

This makes Anchorage the first American jurisdiction to uphold transgender protections on a standalone ballot measure. This win ensures that Anchorage remains one of more than 250 cities and 18 states across the country with similar protections in place.

“Today Anchorage voters rejected fear and intimidation to affirm that everyone in our city should have the same fundamental dignity and protection under the law,” said Lillian Lennon, field organizer for Fair Anchorage, the campaign to defeat Proposition 1. “As a transgender woman, this victory is deeply personal to me and to so many of us in the transgender community. It means voters saw past misleading tactics by opponents of transgender equality in order to treat people like me fairly. In a world that can be so hostile to transgender people in our daily lives, to know that the city of Anchorage has our backs means everything. I’m grateful to the voters, volunteers, and hard-working supporters of our campaign who worked tirelessly to make this night possible.”

“This groundbreaking, first-of-its-kind victory could never have happened without the hard work and courage of transgender people and their families in Anchorage who shared their experiences and stories of how Prop 1 would impact them,” said Kati Ward, campaign manager of Fair Anchorage. “When we learned last year that Proposition 1 might be on the ballot, we began to create a coalition that our city has never seen before. We brought together a powerful alliance of bipartisan elected officials, businesses, faith leaders, safety advocates, women, educators, and families to send the message that Anchorage values freedom for all. This is a victory not only for transgender people, but for their allies and everyone who is proud to call Anchorage a welcoming place.”

Fair Anchorage has run a robust campaign since spring 2017 that has featured local Anchorage residents who would be directly and negatively affected by repeal of the law, particularly transgender youth and their families. In addition, Anchorage’s leading experts on public safety and women’s privacy, including the executive director of STAR, Anchorage’s leading organization to prevent sexual violence; the Anchorage Education Association; more than 110 local bipartisan community leaders; 50 Anchorage businesses including the Anchorage Chamber, Anchorage Economic Development Corporation (AEDC) and Visit Anchorage; and 40 faith leaders and congregations all called on voters to oppose Proposition 1.

More than 250 Fair Anchorage volunteers completed 515 volunteer shifts, knocked on over 2,000 doors, made over 50,000 phone calls, and engaged in over 13,000 direct conversations with Anchorage voters. The campaign garnered nearly 1,200 individual grassroots donors.

Paid for by Fair Anchorage, Anchorage, AK. Joshua Decker, chair, approved this message.

The top three contributors are Freedom For All Americans, Washington, DC; Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands, Seattle, WA; and ACLU of Alaska, Anchorage, AK.

 

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VICTORY: Anchorage Voters Defeat Proposition 1!

By | Blog Post

Anchorage voters have defeated Proposition 1—the dangerous initiative that sought to repeal basic protections for our transgender neighbors, family and friends under municipal law.

With 76K+ votes in, our NO campaign is leading by 52.7%, with only 47.3% voting Yes. So while the municipality will not certify the election results until next Friday, we are confident that, at this point, it would be impossible for Prop 1 to pass.

This historic vote showed that voters in our city rejected fear and intimidation to affirm that transgender people, like everyone else, should be afforded the same dignity and respect as everyone else. Anchorage is now the first municipality in the country in recent years to uphold protections for transgender people at the ballot!

“This groundbreaking, first-of-its-kind victory could never have happened without the hard work and courage of transgender people and their families in Anchorage who shared their experiences and stories of how Prop 1 would impact them,” said Kati Ward, campaign manager of Fair Anchorage. “When we learned last year that Proposition 1 might be on the ballot, we began to create a coalition like our city has never seen before. We brought together a powerful alliance of bipartisan elected officials, businesses, faith leaders, safety advocates, women, educators, and families to send the message that Anchorage values freedom for all. This is a victory not only for transgender people, but for their allies and everyone who is proud to call Anchorage a welcoming place.”

Our fight began in earnest in July of last year, after our opponents’ signature count was determined valid, and Proposition 1 was confirmed to qualify for the ballot. Immediately, we went to work developing our campaign’s infrastructure, building the resources and staff we would need to fight against Prop 1. We built our initial war chest, and started to engage people around the community in working to defend our transgender friends and neighbors.

Throughout our campaign, we were able to consistently amplify the stories and lived experiences of transgender people. Two members of our campaign leadership Denise Sudbeck and Lillian Lennon, both shared their stories of overcoming adversity to help shepherd our campaign to success. We heard from a variety of people, from activist MoHagani Magnetek to Samuel Ohana, who was discriminated against at his job. One of our most effective messengers, high school student Col Lockard, bravely appeared in one of our television ads, telling Anchorage his fears and concerns about Prop 1 becoming law. In addition, we saw a moving piece from Andrea Redeker, a local transgender woman who canvassed in the final days to defeat Proposition 1.

To every transgender person who shared your story and spoke out against Proposition 1: This is your victory. Thank you for your courage and bravery..

This campaign also built one of the strongest coalitions our city has ever seen, with families, businesses, faith leaders, public officials, educators and safety advocates standing together to oppose Prop 1. Over 40 businesses would announce their endorsement of our campaign as we continued through the many months, joined by both the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce and the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation. In March, we featured perhaps our most launched our 2nd TV ad of the campaign featuring Keeley Olsen, executive director of Standing Up Against Rape (STAR), Anchorage’s leading group providing support, resources and information for victims of sexual violence. In the ad, Olsen dispels the myth that transgender people are a safety risk, emphasizing that in the 18 states and over 200 cities where similar nondiscrimination protections are in effect, there has not been a single uptick in public safety incidents. Statewide safety agencies such as Alaska Children’s Trust would also speak out against backers of Prop 1, saying their messaging was having a negative impact on children. Most recently, over 110 bipartisan community leaders came together to oppose Prop 1 in the final days of the campaign.

“Today Anchorage voters rejected fear and intimidation to affirm that everyone in our city should have the same fundamental dignity and protection under the law,” said Lillian Lennon, field organizer for Fair Anchorage, the campaign to defeat Proposition 1. “As a transgender woman, this victory is deeply personal to me and to so many of us in the transgender community. It means voters saw past misleading tactics by opponents of transgender equality in order to treat people like me fairly. In a world that can be so hostile to transgender people in our daily lives, to know that the city of Anchorage has our backs means everything. I’m grateful to the voters, volunteers and hard-working supporters of our campaign who worked tirelessly to make this night possible.”

Fair Anchorage is beyond grateful to the hundreds of volunteers who worked with us making calls, knocking doors, and showing up to public events. We also thank the myriad of businesses, public officials, community leaders, and the regular citizens of Anchorage who were willing to use their voices to speak out against discrimination — a particular thank you to the transgender community, who were so willing to share their stories and experiences with the public, and who actively participated in defending municipal protections. We could not have done any of this without everyone’s help.

So many people can rest easier because our nondiscrimination law has been defended, and it is the combined efforts of many that made this possible. Let us never forget what a determined group of people can do to protect one another and stand up for what is right.

‘No on Prop 1’ Campaign Releases Election Night Statement

By | Press Releases

ANCHORAGE — With only partial results available, Anchorage municipal officials tonight announced that they have counted 49,806 ballots and that the Proposition 1 election is too close to call. An unknown number of ballots are expected to arrive via the mail in the coming days.

The partial results show that 53.9% of people have voted “No” on Proposition 1 and 46.1% have voted “Yes.” If passed, Prop 1 would remove nondiscrimination protections from Anchorage’s city ordinances.

“As this election comes to a close and the final votes are counted, I hope Anchorage residents are proud of what we’ve accomplished together,” said Kati Ward, campaign manager of Fair Anchorage. “Together, we built one of the most incredible, diverse coalitions that Anchorage has ever seen — with parents and families standing alongside faith leaders, safety advocates, educators and iconic local businesses — united behind the belief that Anchorage is stronger when our laws protect transgender people from discrimination.

“Nothing is final until the last ballot is counted — but based on the current numbers, we are hopeful that a majority of Anchorage voters will reject this divisive measure to roll back basic protections for our transgender neighbors and friends. Our team will continue working to ensure every vote is counted and that the voice of every single Anchorage voter is heard in this historic election, because the stakes are too high for anything less.”

This year marks the first time that Anchorage has implemented a 100 percent vote-by-mail system. Voters must have their ballots postmarked by April 3, or drop off their ballots in one of several dropboxes around the city by 8 p.m. Following Election Day, Anchorage municipal officials have 10 days to continue counting ballots postmarked by April 3 and to certify the election results.

Paid for by Fair Anchorage, Anchorage, AK. Joshua Decker, chair, approved this message.

The top three contributors are Freedom For All Americans, Washington, DC; Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands, Seattle, WA; and ACLU of Alaska, Anchorage, AK.

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Election Night Results: We are hopeful

By | Blog Post

With only partial results available, Anchorage municipal officials tonight announced that they have counted 49,806 ballots and that the Proposition 1 election is too close to call. An unknown number of ballots are expected to arrive via the mail in the coming days.

The partial results show that 53.9% of people have voted “No” on Proposition 1 and 46.1% have voted “Yes.” If passed, Prop 1 would remove nondiscrimination protections from Anchorage’s city ordinances.

“As this election comes to a close and the final votes are counted, I hope Anchorage residents are proud of what we’ve accomplished together,” said Kati Ward, campaign manager of Fair Anchorage. “Together, we built one of the most incredible, diverse coalitions that Anchorage has ever seen — with parents and families standing alongside faith leaders, safety advocates, educators and iconic local businesses — united behind the belief that Anchorage is stronger when our laws protect transgender people from discrimination.

“Nothing is final until the last ballot is counted — but based on the current numbers, we are hopeful that a majority of Anchorage voters will reject this divisive measure to roll back basic protections for our transgender neighbors and friends. Our team will continue working to ensure every vote is counted and that the voice of every single Anchorage voter is heard in this historic election, because the stakes are too high for anything less.”

This year marks the first time that Anchorage has implemented a 100 percent vote-by-mail system. Voters must have their ballots postmarked by April 3, or drop off their ballots in one of several dropboxes around the city by 8 p.m. Following Election Day, Anchorage municipal officials have 10 days to continue counting ballots postmarked by April 3 and to certify the election results.

Today is Election Day in Anchorage. Here’s How to Vote No on Prop 1:

By | Blog Post

It’s Election Day in Anchorage—the day voters decide the fate of Proposition 1.

If passed, Proposition1 would repeal the basic protections under municipal law that have kept our transgender neighbors and friends safe for the last two years.

A broad coalition has joined together to oppose this initiative—including transgender people, parents, 40+ faith leaders, 50+ businesses, educators, safety advocates and 110+ bipartisan Anchorage leaders. Proposition 1 is discriminatory, unnecessary and unenforceable. And today, we’re hopeful that Anchorage voters will reject it to uphold our existing non-discrimination law.

Because Anchorage’s Municipal Election is 100% vote-by-mail, there are not polling locations like past elections.

All ballots must be postmarked by today or returned by 8pm to one of 12 ballot return boxes across Anchorage: 

  • Anchorage School District Education Center, 5530 East Northern Lights Boulevard
  • Bartlett High School, 1101 Golden Bear Drive
  • Clark Middle School, 150 Bragaw Street
  • Dimond High School, 2909 West 88th Avenue
  • Fairview Community Recreation Center, 1121 East 10th Avenue
  • Loussac Library, 3600 Denali Street
  • Service High School, 5577 Abbott Road
  • Spenard Community Recreation Center, 2020 West 48th Avenue
  • UAA Alaska Airlines Center, 3550 Providence Drive
  • Eagle River Town Center, 12001 Business Boulevard
  • Girdwood Community Center, 250 Egloff Drive
  • South Anchorage High School, 13400 Elmore Road

The fate of non-discrimination protections for transgender youth like Col hang in the balance as the ballots come in today. Let’s affirm that discrimination has no place in Anchorage—and that every Alaskan should be afforded the same privacy and dignity under the law:

 

Five Reasons You Should Vote No on Proposition 1

By | Blog Post

In tomorrow’s election, Anchorage voters will decide the fate of our municipality’s non-discrimination protections for our transgender neighbors, family and friends. Here are five reasons you should vote NO on Proposition 1.

1. Transgender People Deserve the Same Protections As Everyone Else Under Anchorage Law

Since 2015, transgender people have been afforded the same nondiscrimination protections as everyone else under municipal law and in that time, there has not been a single negative effect as a result. Transgender people simply want the same rights afforded to all other people — the ability to live openly and participate fully in the world, without the fear of being harassed, intimidated, or vulnerable to violence. Furthermore, they should have the same security as everyone else — that when it comes to finding a retaining a job, moving into a residence, or accessing public accommodations, they won’t be discriminated against or turned away simply for being who they are.

2. Proposition 1 Would Harm Transgender Youth

If basic protections for transgender people under Anchorage law are repealed, it’s transgender students who would be the most impacted. Current municipal law ensures protections for transgender students in Anchorage’s public schools. The Anchorage Education Association has already come out in a statement saying that Prop 1 is dangerous, and does not align with the values of the school district.

Transgender youth are most vulnerable in instances of discrimination, and feel that their school does not have their best interests or well-being in mind. Growing up in a municipality that would openly vote to strip you of your rights would no doubt harm students across Anchorage.

Fair Anchorage featured a family, the Lockards, in a series of television and web ads where their transgender son Col spoke out about why keeping these protections in place is vital for his safety:

“I’m scared that if Proposition 1 passes, I would be bullied and harassed, and forced to use the girls’ restroom at school.”

Another transgender student, C.J. Gillis, also spoke out in an interview with KTVA, where he and his family spoke about C.J.’s coming out process, as well as why it is safest and most logical for C.J. to use the boys’ restroom, as it corresponds to his gender identity.

3. Proposition 1 Won’t Make Anchorage Safer

Our opponents have continually pushed a false narrative that transgender people are dangerous and to be feared, and that ensuring everyone can use the restroom that corresponds with their gender identity poses a severe security risk, mostly to women and girls. However, we know nothing could be further from the truth. In the 18 states and over 200 cities—including Anchorage—where similar nondiscrimination protections are in effect, there has not been a single uptick in public safety incidents.

Anchorage Police Chief Justin Doll testified before the Anchorage General Assembly that he and his department see “no concern” about transgender people in public bathrooms, and that were it to pass, he “doesn’t [sic] have the staff to post an officer at every bathroom” to enforce the initiative as written. Additionally, President of the Anchorage Local Firefighters Union, Mike Stambaugh, addresses his organization’s disapproval in a strongly worded letter to the editor underscoring that basic protections for our transgender neighbors does not pose a threat to public safety..

Perhaps the most powerful voice has been that of Keeley Olson, the executive director of Standing Up Against Rape (STAR), Anchorage’s leading group providing resources, support, and care for victims of sexual violence. Olsen has compellingly made the argument that women and girls are no less safe with transgender women having access to women’s bathrooms and locker rooms, and that, “ensuring dignity to transgender people is not a threat to public safety.”

Additional groups including the Alaska Children’s Trust, Alaska Children’s Alliance, and Alaska Network on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault have criticized the efforts of Prop 1 proponents, warning that misleading messaging guiding this initiative is doing the most damage to children in Anchorage.

4. Parents and Teachers Across Anchorage Are Voting NO

Proposition 1 would put real families—and young people—in danger across Anchorage. That’s why a broad coalition of families and educators have joined us in speaking out against this discriminatory initiative, urging Anchorage voters to reject Prop 1 to keep our students safe.

The Lockard family put their story front and center, and have spoken to people across the city about what it is like to raise a transgender child and be concerned for their safety. Additionally, many of the women of Anchorage featured in one of our ads are mothers themselves, who believe that all children should grow up in a city that affords dignity and respect to everyone who calls Anchorage home, regardless of who they are or how they identify.

And while the Anchorage School District is legally prohibited from taking a stance on ballot initiatives, Dr. Deena Bishop, Anchorage City School superintendent,  explained at a School Board meeting earlier this year that the current law protecting transgender students is working well—and that if Proposition 1 were to pass, the Anchorage School District would not “stand guard at the bathroom doors” to enforce discrimination against transgender students. Additionally, several individual teachers have spoken out against the need for Prop 1, saying it would have long-lasting, negative consequences on students.

Carol Comeau, former head superintendent of the Anchorage School District, says not only is this cruel—it’s against the mission of the Anchorage School District.

“The mission of the Anchorage School District is ‘To educate ALL students for success in life,’” she says, quoting the motto she’s had memorized for more than 30 years. “The ALL is in caps for a reason. Every student should be able to go to school to focus on learning, not being targeted for discrimination because of their gender identity.”

5. Proposition 1 Will Harm Anchorage’s Economy

Anchorage stands to sustain a severe economic loss if this discriminatory ballot measure passes this week.

On February 5, the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce released a statement opposing Proposition 1. The group, which has represented over 900 businesses and their 50,000 employees in Anchorage for over 100 years, said partly:

“The Anchorage Chamber of Commerce believes that passing Proposition 1 would be detrimental to business in the city. Many conferences and potential new business would be lost due to this discriminatory legislation which would convey the message that Anchorage is not a welcoming city.”

Shortly following the Chamber’s announcement, the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation sent a letter to its Board of Directors, stating:

“AEDC believes this initiative would inflict unnecessary discrimination on members of the community, and that it solves no evident problem that has been created by the original passage of the anti-discrimination ordinance. Moreover, this ordinance would have significant negative economic impacts on our city, the largest economy in the state.”

Over 40 local businesses—including staples of Anchorage like Beartooth, Snow City Cafe and Fire Island Rustic Bakery–also joined together in a coalition and announced their combined support for a No vote.

Election Day is next TOMORROW. All ballots must be postmarked or returned to a ballot drop box by 8pm on Tuesday night. Click here to visit our Election Center for all the information you need.

Anchorage, let’s stand together to keep discrimination out of our city!

“The Law Makes Me Feel Safer — We Must Vote No on Prop 1”

By | Voices

EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece was written by Andrea Redeker, a transgender woman and a resident of Anchorage.

As a transgender person, I know all too well the daily fear that will reenter my life if Prop 1 passes.

Anchorage’s non-discrimination ordinance makes it safer for transgender people to exist in public spaces. The law offers us basic protection as we move about the city, from grocery stores and schools to office spaces. The promise of legal protection gives us the assurance we need invest in our communities, offer our employers strong work ethics and integrity, and raise our families safely. It protects us from being fired from our jobs, or thrown out into the street, simply because we are transgender. It has given me the same legal defense against discrimination that every other Anchorage resident gets. It has given me the taste of equality, and has made me feel safer in this city.

Proposition 1 would strip away protections for transgender people and make us less safe.

I have a friend who is a transgender man. He has an amazing wife and a couple of amazing young children. I asked him what he was most afraid of if Prop 1 passed. He looked me in the eye, and told me that he was terrified that he would be forced into a women’s restroom. I asked him what specifically he was afraid of. He brushed his beard, and the look on his face became solemn. He said he was terrified that his children might have to watch their father be beaten or killed by men who saw him enter the women’s restroom, the bathroom that matched his birth certificate but nothing else about him.

His fears aren’t overblown. They reflect a reality that is rarely talked about when we discuss public safety in this city: transgender individuals are victims of violence at alarming rates. I have seen the statistics — that 8 in 10 transgender individuals are harassed in public spaces, a majority have been victims of assault. And in recent years, as opponents of LGBT rights have singled out transgender people with bathroom initiatives like Prop 1, violence against transgender individuals has increased.

For me, these statistics are more than numbers. They are cold and emotionless way of describing the reality I face when I leave my house in the morning. They represent the real lived experiences of too many of us in this community.

One of my transgender friends was assaulted by her client when driving a cab. He verbally abused her, and threw objects at her, while she drove down the road. He did this because she is transgender.

A young transgender man told be about being brutally assaulted in his high school. His head was slammed against his locker door repeatedly until he lost consciousness. They did this to him because he is transgender.

I myself, a transgender woman, survived a brutal assault at my place of work, survived rape, and have experienced a violent sexual assault in a bathroom that matched my birth certificate.

I am not trying to suggest that the backers of Proposition 1 condone violence. But I do believe that the ballot initiative and the violence we experience both stem from the same source: a fear of what is not understood, and a refusal to see us as individuals, who are full and complete as we are, and who deserve to live with dignity.

The non-discrimination law has given us dignity and equal protection under the law. It is hard to describe how that feels. I’m not ready for that to be taken away. Proposition 1 would make us fear public spaces once again, construct our days around using bathrooms only at home, and drive us away from public life. After two years of equality, Proposition 1 feels nothing but demeaning.

As much stress as this election has brought me, it has been incredible to witness the outpouring of opposition to the ballot initiative — from politicians, businesses, faith leaders, and friends, to people who are volunteering hours every week to defeat this initiative and defend my very existence in this city. They remind me that Anchorage is full of people that are driven by love and goodness. They give me great hope that my hometown will defend my safety, uphold my right to equality–that this city will say “No” to Proposition 1.

Law Enforcement, Republicans, and 110+ Community Leaders Oppose Prop 1

By | Press Releases
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 29, 2018
Contact: Kati Ward, Fair Anchorage Campaign Manager, 907-202-6272kati@fairanchorage.org

ANCHORAGE — A nonpartisan group of more than 110 Anchorage community leaders, including a number of Republicans and law enforcement officers, have announced that they oppose Proposition 1, the ballot measure that would repeal Anchorage’s two-year-old transgender nondiscrimination law.

The full list can be found here.

“Proposition 1 is one of the most divisive, harmful initiatives I’ve seen on the ballot in our beloved city,” said Arliss Sturgulewski, a former Republican state Senator who served for nearly 15 years. “Other cities have passed initiatives like Prop 1, and we have seen the consequence: businesses, tourists, and major events went elsewhere. This spring we have a chance to learn from their mistakes. We’ll say loud and clear that although Anchorage is welcoming, we do not welcome discrimination.”

“The Municipality of Anchorage currently has a sensible system of protecting everyone’s right to use public facilities in a manner that is protective of individual privacy and that avoids needless government intrusion into intimate daily personal decisions,” said Bill Evans, former Republican Assembly member, attorney, and author of Anchorage’s nondiscrimination law. “The best proof of this system is that there have been no problems associated with bathroom use the past two years. Do not abandon this common-sense, realistic and workable approach. Vote NO on Prop 1.”

“While backers of Prop. 1 claim they’re advocating for public safety, nothing could be further from the truth,” said Mike Stumbaugh, president of Anchorage Firefighters Union Local 1264. “And in the 200-plus cities and 18 states with laws nearly identical to Anchorage’s nondiscrimination law, the results have been the same: Protecting transgender people is not a threat to public safety — here in Anchorage or anywhere else in the country.”

“If there were public safety problems from the law, I would support changes,” said Paul Honeman, former APD police officer and former Anchorage Assembly member. “But it is extremely clear that Anchorage has not had safety problems from our equality ordinance.”

“Proposition 1 is unethical and unnecessary,” said Andrew Halcro, former Republican state legislator. “I find it absolutely insulting.”

“Proposition 1 is about vilifying a group of people who are different,” said Ron McGee, former spokesperson of the Anchorage Police Department. “We all know these people; they are our sons and daughters, the kid who grew up down the street from us, or that young person who just got hired at your work. I choose to love these people, not make them into outcasts. That’s why I’m voting no against Proposition 1 on April 3.”

“Alaska’s constitution is clear in its emphasis on political, civil and religious liberty and on the individual rights of all Alaskans,” said Vic Fischer, who served in Alaska’s territorial Legislature and its state Senate, was a delegate to the 1955 Alaska Constitutional Convention, and helped author Alaska’s state constitution. “If you, as an Alaskan, agree with Alaska’s fundamental constitutional principles – please vote “no” on Proposition 1.”

Additionally, Medical Park Family Care, one of the city’s oldest, largest, and most respected private health care providers, added its name to more than 30 other businesses, including the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce and the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation, who are urging voters to vote No on Prop 1.

Earlier this week, the Anchorage Education Association, the second largest organization of teachers in Alaska with more than 3,300 members, announced its opposition to Proposition 1, stating that it would harm students and leave them feeling unsafe in school. More than 40 faith leaders have called the initiative “discriminatory and harmful” to transgender people in Anchorage. Anchorage’s leading experts working on behalf of safety and privacy for women are also opposing Proposition 1.

For more information, visit: http://www.fairanchorage.org

Paid for by Fair Anchorage No on Prop 1, Anchorage, AK. Joshua Decker, Chair, approved this message.

The top three contributors are Freedom For All Americans, Washington, DC;
Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands, Seattle, WA;
and ACLU of Alaska, Anchorage, AK.

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110+ Bipartisan Anchorage Community Leaders Oppose Prop 1, Urge NO Vote

By | Blog Post, Uncategorized

A bipartisan group of more than 110 Anchorage community leaders have announced that they oppose Proposition 1, the ballot measure that would repeal Anchorage’s two-year-old transgender nondiscrimination law.

“Proposition 1 is one of the most divisive, harmful initiatives I’ve seen on the ballot in our beloved city,” said Arliss Sturgulewski, a former Republican state Senator who served for nearly 15 years. “Other cities have passed initiatives like Prop 1, and we have seen the consequence: businesses, tourists, and major events went elsewhere. This spring we have a chance to learn from their mistakes. We’ll say loud and clear that although Anchorage is welcoming, we do not welcome discrimination.”

Bill Evans, the Republican Assembly member who authored Anchorage’s nondiscrimination law, said, “There have been no problems associated with bathroom use the past two years. Do not abandon this common-sense, realistic and workable approach. Vote NO on Prop 1.”

“Proposition 1 is about vilifying a group of people who are different,” said Ron McGee, former spokesperson of the Anchorage Police Department. “We all know these people; they are our sons and daughters, the kid who grew up down the street from us, or that young person who just got hired at your work. I choose to love these people, not make them into outcasts. That’s why I’m voting no against Proposition 1 on April 3.”

“If there were public safety problems from the law, I would support changes,” said Paul Honeman, former APD police officer and former Anchorage Assembly member. “But it is extremely clear that Anchorage has not had safety problems from our equality ordinance.”

“Proposition 1 is unethical and unnecessary,” said Andrew Halcro, former Republican state legislator. “I find it absolutely insulting.”

30 other businesses, including the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce and the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation, who are urging voters to vote No on Prop 1.

Earlier this week, the Anchorage Education Association, the largest organization of teachers in Alaska with more than 13,000 members, announced its opposition to Proposition 1, stating that it would harm students and leave them feeling unsafe in school. Dr. Deena Bishop, superintendent of Anchorage City Schools, also added her voice to the chorus of opposition. More than 40 faith leaders have called the initiative “discriminatory and harmful” to transgender people in Anchorage. Anchorage’s leading experts working on behalf of safety and privacy for women are also opposing Proposition 1.

Parents and Transgender Youth Host Final Canvass for No on Prop 1 Push

By | Press Releases

FOR PLANNING PURPOSESMarch 29, 2018
Contact: Kati Ward, Fair Anchorage Campaign Manager, 907-202-6272kati@fairanchorage.org

ANCHORAGE
 – Transgender youth, their parents, and a broad coalition of Anchorage residents will canvass together on Saturday morning in the final push to defeat Proposition 1, which would repeal basic protections for transgender people from discrimination under municipal law. Families who would be most impacted by Proposition 1 will be available for interviews with the media.

The canvass coincides with International Transgender Day of Visibility—a day focused on elevating the experiences and contributions of transgender people in their communities.

  • WHO: Parents, transgender children alongside a broad coalition of Anchorage residents voting no on Prop 1—including David Lockard and his transgender son Col, who have been featured in No on Prop 1 advertising; and Cathy Gillis and her transgender son CJ, who were featured this week in a KTVA story about the harmful ramifications of Prop 1 on transgender youth.

  • WHAT: No on Prop 1 canvass on Transgender Day of Visibility, with remarks by Anchorage families who would be impacted by Prop 1.

  • WHEN: 10:00 AM – 2:00 PMSaturday, March 31st

  • WHERE: 1057 Fireweed Ln; Anchorage

Anchorage’s leading experts on public safety and women’s privacy, educators, and more than 30 Anchorage businesses and 40 faith leaders and congregations have called on voters to oppose Proposition 1 and vote no on the ballot measure by April 3. Fair Anchorage has led a robust campaign featuring local residents who would be directly and negatively affected by repeal of the law.

For more information, visit www.fairanchorage.org.

Paid for by Fair Anchorage No on Prop 1, Anchorage, AK. Joshua Decker, Chair, approved this message.

The top three contributors are Freedom For All Americans, Washington, DC;
Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands, Seattle, WA;
and ACLU of Alaska, Anchorage, AK.